YEARS GONE BY
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Schuylkill Haven....
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JUNE 1919
The Call of June 6, 1919

VALUABLE DOG BROKE LEGS
"Luke," a valuable dog, the property of a medicine company holding forth in Schuylkill Haven this week,
jumped from the second story window of Hotel Grand to the street Tuesday evening and broke both of its front
legs.  The animal was taken to Dr. Frederici, of Orwigsburg, and the broken bones set and placed in splints.  
The animal is well trained and is of French descent, his sire and dam having carried messages in the French
army for several years.  The dog was brought to this country by his master, who was in Uncle Sam's service.

SENT TO REFORMATORY
Stanley, son of Mr. and Mrs. Mease of Berne Street, was sent to the Glen Mills Reformatory upon the orders of
the court this week.  The boy was one of several who some time ago broke into one of the school buildings.  
He had been placed on parole and recently had appropriated some candy for himself, which act brought him
again before the court with the above results.

DR. ROBERT LENKER TO OPEN OFFICE ON MAIN STREET
Lieutenant Robert Lenker, who has served Uncle Sam in the Medical Corps and is still in the service at
Patchogue, New York, expects to be mustered out shortly.  He will then return to Schuylkill haven and open an
office on Main Street, having purchased the Murphy home now occupied by H. I. Kline.  Lieutenant Lenker is
the son of Dr. and Mrs. C. Lenker and for several years prior to his enlistment in the service has practiced
medicine in Leesport, where he established a large and successful practice.  He is a graduate of Jefferson
College.


The Call of June 13, 1919

ANOTHER BATHING RESORT FOR THE TOWN
Schuylkill Haven is to have two bathing resorts in its midst shortly.  In addition to Willow Lake on Garfield
Avenue, located at one end of the town, Bittle's Dam at the extreme opposite end of the town is to be
converted into a similar resort.  The dam is being deepened and cleaned.  A bath house is being erected,
bathing suits have been purchased and will be rented at a nominal sum to bathers.  It will be ready for use
shortly.

BEACH OPENING POSTPONED
The opening of the Killian Bathing Beach, which was to have taken place last Sunday, was postponed and will
take place this Sunday.  The Citizen's Band will be present and give a concert.  The beach has, as has been
stated in these columns heretofore, been put in a first class condition to accommodate a large number of
persons who wish to enjoy bathing in fresh spring water.

AUTO ACCIDENTS
Wednesday was an eventful day for auto accidents in this section.  Rosser Thomas, while attempting to drive
his newly purchased car into the garage at the end of the Edward Beck lot, got too close to the wall of the
creek.  The wall gave way and the car plunged into the creek.  Some twenty five men and women with ropes
were required to rescue it which was done but with little damage to the car.
The daughter of Martin Fidler, of Center Avenue, had a narrow escape from being run down on Wednesday
evening while crossing Center Avenue in front of her home.  An auto going south was compelled to run onto
the pavement in front of the Butz store in order to avoid hitting the girl.  
Two machines going north collided with one another at the silent policeman on Wednesday evening about ten
o'clock.  How the accident occurred was not explained unless the first machine stopped suddenly and the
second driver could not stop in time to avoid hitting the first one.

HAD AN ABUNDANCE OF ROSES
This town had many beautiful rose gardens in various parts of town this year as is the annual condition but the
several days rain of the previous week greatly interfered with the growth of many of the flowers and spoiled
many that were in bloom.  The bushes producing an unusual abundance of the pretty June flower were those
of Mrs. John Kauterman of Saint John Street, from which in nine days time, thirty two large bouquets were
taken and distributed to the sick and shut ins of the United Brethren Church.

HALF HOLIDAYS GENERALLY OBSERVED
The Wednesday afternoon half holidays will be quite generally observed in Schuylkill Haven.  The first for the
season was that of Wednesday of this week and the afternoon found many of the stores of various kinds
closed.  The practice will be continued throughout the summer months.

SOLDIERS ORGANIZE BASEBALL TEAM
Schuylkill Haven's returned soldier boys have organized a base ball team and are looking for good amateur
teams to play either on Saturday or Sunday.  This coming Sunday the team will play Mount Laffee at Connor's
Crossing.  The game will be called at 2:30.  The new team is styled the Schuylkill haven Cubs.  The lineup is as
follows: catcher, Webber; pitchers, Shawk, Fisher, Brown; 1b, Mullin; 2b, Gehrig; ss, Roeder; 3b, Gehrig; lf,
Semmet; cf, Knarr; rf, Brown.  The manager is William J. Webber.


The Call of June 20, 1919

WATER DAM IS REPORTED OVERFLOWING
Reports from persons who recently visited the water dam in the Panther Valley are to the effect that the dam is
still running over.  That is fine news for the public and it is hoped that this condition may continue throughout
the summer months.  The persons taking the inventory of the property of the water company have completed
their work.  All of the property has been inventoried and is now ready for the appraisers.  These persons will
begin their work very shortly.  They will set and determine the value that is to be placed upon each separate
piece of property of the company and when the total has been ascertained the facts will be submitted to the
town council and the next procedure in the purchase of the property will be taken up.

SHIPPED STRAWBERRIES TO PHILADELPHIA
Housewives have been wondering why strawberries in Schuylkill Haven have been so scarce for the past
week.  There is a good reason for this scarcity although the farmers in this section brought large quantities to
town, but instead of selling them at retail, they sold as wholesale at the Reading freight yards.  The berries
were loaded onto cars and shipped to Philadelphia.  Three car loads had been shipped away up until
Wednesday of this week and it was stated additional cars would be sent away in the near future.

ORDER FOR NEXT SIX MONTHS
During the past week some of the employees of the Union Knitting Mills have been enjoying their summer
vacation and in the mean time inventory has been taken in the mill and preparations made to start work on the
next season's goods.  The mill will be in operation full handed by July 7th.  Sufficient orders have already been
received to keep the mill working full capacity for at least six months.

MAKE IT CONVENIENT FOR PEDESTRIANS
With the razing of a landmark in the town, the Neiheiser property on Saint John Street, comes the question of
continuing Saint John Street pavement on the east side of the street.  This particular property has for years
been an encroachment on the pavement necessitating pedestrians going into the street at this point.  The
matter was before the town council years ago and it was then stated that it would be impossible to remove the
same without tearing down the house.  The house has now been torn down and there remains but the
retaining wall which is on the pavement line.  In the way of improvements, and as a convenience for persons
using Saint John Street, wouldn't it be a matter for the town council to look into and have this bank removed at
this time.

CHERRY TREE TRIMMED BY THIEVES
The cherry tree in the yard of Mrs. H. G. Weist, overhanging the Dock Street pavement, was stripped of about
seventy quarts of cherries by thieves early Friday morning.  The discovery was made when leaves and small
branches were noticed strewn over the lawn and pavement.  The thieves must have had their nerve with them
as an electric light near the vicinity illuminates it and members of the Weist household slept in rooms
adjoining the tree.  This is the first time in some fifty years that this tree has been stripped of its luscious fruit.


The Call of June 27, 1919

HAD AUTO STOLEN
John Schaeffer of Garfield Avenue after filling his auto with gasoline and making all preparations for a
pleasure trip, placed the machine in his garage.  Sunday morning when he opened the garage, Mr. Auto was
not there, it having been stolen during the night.  Up until this the state police have been unable to locate it.

CANDY KITCHEN TO OPEN JULY 10th
Mr. Parris Lazos has been in town for the past week getting the Keller store room in shape for the opening of
his candy kitchen and ice cream parlor.  Painters were busy during the week.  Next week the installation of the
fixtures will be commenced.  Mr. Lazos expects to have the store ready for the public by July 10th at which
time a grand opening will be arranged for.

NO FIREWORKS BEFORE JULY 1ST
Burgess Sharadin has issued orders to persons who sell fireworks that the same are not to be sold before
Tuesday, July 1st.  The orders are being generally observed.  The borough ordinance prohibiting the use of
blank cartridges, large sized dynamite crackers and fireworks will likely be enforced by the borough officers.

BEE CRAWLED IN CHILD'S EAR
Screaming in pain and the parents for a time not being able to discover the cause, the child of Mr. and Mrs. D.
C. Gilham had the parents very much excited for a time.  The cause of the trouble was finally discovered,
namely one of Mr. Gilham's bees had crawled into the child's ear and was exploring the inner parts.  The child
was hurriedly taken to the office of Dr. Detweiler who removed Mr. Bee in a short time.
ADS FROM
THE CALL
NEWSPAPER IN
JUNE 1919