YEARS GONE BY
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Schuylkill Haven....
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JULY 1918
The Call of July 5, 1918

RAILROAD ACROSS SCHUYLKILL
John Sirroco who operates a washery near Columbia Street, has just completed the construction of railroad
tracks across the Schuylkill River.  He will use several small cars in bringing the coal dirt or culm from the
opposite side of the river to his washery where it will be screened.

SLIGHT WRECK NEAR SHOPS
A slight wreck occurred near the local shops during the week, when one of a number of shop cars that were
being transferred from one section of the yard to another jumped the tracks on the bridge spanning the
Schuylkill River and it was necessary to call the wreck crew to clear the tracks and raise the car.

FLAG TO FLY ALWAYS
A suggestion was made by the secretary of the Town Council at its recent meeting that the flag of the Town
Hall be displayed at all times instead of on special occasions only, as ordered by council some time ago.  It was
stated councilmen Mill, Carr and McKeon have sons in the service.  Councilmen Saul, Bashore, Bitzer and
Gehrig have close relatives in the service.  The street commissioner of the borough had a son in the service
and the ex mayor of the town was also in the service.  That in all some 256 town men were enlisted in the war
and that the council should at least honor these men to a greater extent than to put out the flag on special
occasions only.  A motion was immediately passed and the building committee was ordered to procure a five
by eight foot flag and it is to be displayed at all times and is to be renewed when worn out.  

POOR WATER PRESSURE
Fire Chief Commings made a report for the past six months.  He reported a number of fire plugs in need of
repair.  His principal and most important item in his report was that in the recent examination and test of fire
plugs made by him at night, in not one instance was there a sufficient pressure to throw the full stream half
way across the street.  The water committee of the borough was instructed to have the repairs to the fire
plugs made at once.

WOMEN'S BIBLE CLASS TO HERSHEY
The members of the Women's Bible Class of Saint John's Reformed Church enjoyed a picnic at Hershey on
Saturday.  The members made the trip in the Moyer auto buses and in autos owned by private individuals.  A
slight accident marred the pleasure of the day when two of the autos collided, the one knocking the wheels
from the other.  None of the occupants were even slightly injured and all returned home safely.

The Call of July 12, 1918

LESS TROLLEY STOPS AFTER MONDAY
After Monday, July 15th, there will be fewer trolley stops in Schuylkill Haven, likewise the entire county and
state.  When The Call went to press the officials of the Eastern Pennsylvania Railway Company were busy
making out their list of stops in each town through which their lines pass.  These stops will be announced next
week.  It is the intention to have one stop in each thirteen hundred feet.  This would mean that a car coming
from Pottsville enroute to Orwigsburg would probably make the first stop at Brown's corner in Spring Garden.  
The next stop would be at Broadway and the third stop at The Call office, the fourth stop at Hotel Grand and
the fifth stop at William Street.  This would do away with the stops at Coal Street, Berger Street, Paxson
Avenue, Saint Peter Street and Market Street.  Fewer stops are made necessary on account of a government
ruling to conserve fuel and power.

RESIDENTS CONFER ON WATER QUESTION
A meeting lasting more than one and a half hours was held on Friday evening last between the residents of
South Berne Street and the members of the Board of Health.  The meeting was for the purpose of having
these residents do away with their pumps and installing borough water.  It is understood that the majority of
the residents are in favor of the borough water but are of the opinion that a larger main than two inches
should be constructed.  A representative of the water company was unable to be present and in all probability
another meeting will be held in the near future.

PRESENTED WITH GOLD WATCH CHAIN
B. Frank Gehrig, who on Wednesday of the present week, severed his connections as an employee of Uncle
Sam, was presented with a handsome gold watch chain by Postmaster Ebling and the employees of the local
post office.  Frank prizes his gift very highly and with moisture in his eyes, thanked them for their
thoughtfulness and consideration.  He hoped that the chain, although small in length, would continue to bind
still tighter the friendship that has existed between the employees and himself.

FIREWORKS STARTS SMALL BLAZE
The sparks from a Roman candle started an incipient blaze at the home of R. J. Hoffman on Prospect Hill.  The
sparks landed on a piece of carpet on the rear porch, burning a hole in the same and scorching a washing
machine.  The fire was discovered by Mrs. Hoffman, who unassisted heroically procured a bucket and
extinguished the flames.

MINISTERS WILL EXCHANGE PULPITS
The Protestant ministers of town will exchange pulpits both Sunday mornings and evenings.  No minister will
in the same church twice in the same day.  The only persons who know will deliver the sermon in the
respective churches are the ministers themselves.  All congregations are sure to have eloquent sermons at
both services.

DEFENDANT WALKED AWAY
Granted permission to telephone for someone to get his bail, Charles Shadler, charged with nuisance and
disturbing the peace, walked out of the office of Squire C. A. Moyer shortly after 9:30 o'clock last night and
never came back.  Shadler on learning that w a warrant was out for his arrest surrendered himself before the
warrant could be served.  It was while the officers were after the prosecutor that Shadler took French leave.

COULD BE CHARGED WITH CRUELTY
Some unknown person, during the last week shot at and badly wounded the pet dog of Mrs. Fred B. Reed of
William Street.  The shots struck the dog on the ear and head making a bad wound. These persons or person
could be placed under arrest charged with cruelty to animals.  Under the new law, a dog running at large, night
or day, tagged or untagged, can be killed and the owner compelled to bury it, but shooting at a dog and not
killing it is cruelty to animals.

MARY'S SLUMBERS WERE DISTURBED
Mrs. Joseph Grieff, who is probably better known as Mary Kobb, objected to her slumbers being disturbed by
means of a tick tack on her front door and caused the arrest of Stella Smith, Gussie Lloyd, William Leeser and
Charles "Champ" Ney, on the charge of disorderly conduct and disturbing the peace.  The warrants were
sworn out before Squire C. A. Moyer on Tuesday morning and served by Constable John Butz.  At the hearing
Mary presented a large brick and about thirty yards of tape, such as is used by underwear mills, as evidence of
the noise made when the brick was pulled and then let go against the door.  Several witnesses were called by
the prosecutor but neither one could identify any of the defendants and the case was dismissed with the costs
on the prosecutor.


The Call of July 19, 1918

CHAMPION BERRY PICKERS
Charles Loy and his brother Carl are the champion huckleberry pickers of this vicinity and issue a challenge to
anyone to equal their record.  Following his day's work, Charles Loy has gathered in the evenings and other
spare time more than 69 quarts of the wild fruit and his brother ten quarts making a total of 79 quarts.  Three
quarts of blackberries were also gathered by the brothers.

TRACTION COMPANY REPAIRING ROADBED
A force of employees from the Traction Company are at work this week repairing the roadbed along their line
on Saint John Street.  New sills are replacing those that have been rotted.  As a result of this repairing the
street is in bad shape and autoists should us a little precaution while passing over it.


The Call of July 26, 1918

EUCLID THEATRE WILL NOT BE REOPENED
George of Ginader, of reading, who it was stated several weeks ago had leased the Euclid Theatre at this
place and intended conducting the place as a moving picture theatre has since changed his mind and will not
do so.  The theatre for the immediate present will not be opened, however, there are several other parties
negotiating for the lease of the theatre and it is probable the same will be opened at a later date.

TINSMITHERS HAVE NARROW ESCAPE
Messrs. Ray Reed and Clarence Moser, two tinsmithers, had narrow escape from being struck by lightning
Wednesday afternoon during the storm.  They were at work on a ladder at the Bast properties on Saint John
Street and were hurrying to get through when a bolt struck nearby and found its way along the gutter of the
house on which the two men were working.  A galvanized elbow was knocked from their hands.  They decided
it was time to quit work for the afternoon.

AUTO WISHED TO VISIT HOSPITAL
About eleven o'clock Tuesday evening an automobile, the identity of the driver could not be learned, in
making the corner of Dock and Main Streets, plunged over the curbing in front of the G. H. Moore private
hospital and mounting the pavement struck the stone coping in front of the same.  The driver, without any
fussing or ceremony, backed the machine off the pavement, turned the car down Main Street and continued
on his way.  Evidently the machine or the driver needed attention at this eye hospital so that curves can
hereafter be taken with better grace.

SUPERVISOR IMPROVING COLUMBIA STREET
Supervisor Huy has a force of men at work making extensive improvements on Columbia Street.  A number of
crossings that were a nuisance to autoists and teamsters are being raised, while other sections of the street
are being filled up.  This is one of the best kept streets and the most used in town.
ADS FROM THE
CALL NEWSPAPER
IN JULY OF 1918