YEARS GONE BY
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JULY 2017
The Call of July 6, 1917

PICNIC IN BOWEN'S GROVE
At a meeting of the representatives of the several Sunday Schools of town on Monday evening last, it was
decided to hold the Union picnic on July 18th at Bowen's Grove.  Eiler's band has been engaged for the
occasion.  A refreshment stand will be erected.  Provisions have been made to take both the children and
elderly persons to the grove and to carry the baskets both to and from the grove.  The time and place of
leaving the baskets will be announced later on.  At present a committee is at work preparing a program of
sports and entertainments.

HARVESTING FROM FARM PLOTS
The harvesting from the hundred or more farm plots about the town has already started.  Each young farmer
has been provided with a stock sheet on which they are asked to keep an accurate account of all vegetables
taken from the plots.  It is really surprising the amount of green truck that has already been raised and the
amount that remains to be harvested.  During the past week, two prizes were awarded of one dollar each, for
the persons raising the largest radishes.  These prizes were distributed to Miss Alva Heim and Franklin
Schumacher.  The list of prizes as awarded will be published in The Call.

FIGHT YESTERDAY MORNING
Five o'clock yesterday morning the residents living near the Pennsylvania arch were aroused from their
slumbers as a result of a fight.  It is understood that a well known Spring Garden resident became engaged in
the fistic encounter with two Pottsville residents, because the former refused to buy the two men a drink.  The
local man was badly used up.

YOUTH STABBED IN ARM
Homer Ribkee is suffering as a result of a stab wound from a pen knife.  Ribkee was standing near the old
dock with a number of companions when it is alleged that someone pushed another overboard.  As soon as
the victim got out of the water, he accused Ribkee of the offense and then assaulted him with the knife,
stabbing him in the arm.  The wound is not deep and not serious.  No arrests have been made.

NO WONDER THE PHILLIES LOST
Spring Garden residents could not understand why the Phillies lost the afternoon Fourth of July game to the
weak team like Boston.  Here's the reason.  Messrs. Abe Maberry, William Hinkle, Earl Seitzinger, Leroy Edling,
George Shelly and Howard Seitzinger witnessed the two games of ball in Philadelphia on Wednesday.

A SPOOK WITH A LANTERN
A spook with a red lantern is disturbing the quietude of the residents of this locality.  For the past several
weeks he has been making his appearance on the cemetery, walking from there to the Lehigh Valley railroad
and then disappearing as if by magic.  His antics have been witnessed by no less than half the residents along
Center and Garfield Avenues.  Just what the significance of the red light means has not been explained.  
Somewhere it is recorded that his Satanic Majesty carries a red light and it is just possible that one of his imps
has fallen from grace and come to Mother Earth and he was here, believing he came to the right place.


The Call of July 13, 1917

AUTOS COLLIDE ON STATE ROAD
As the result of a collision between two Ford autos on Sunday night at a point near the old Boyer mill, both
machines were badly wrecked and the occupants had narrow escapes from serious injury.  The one car was
occupied by John and Richard Koch, Norman Mimm, Helen Moyer and Esther Scheipe, residing below
Orwigsburg.  The other car was owned and driven by Rudy Fritz of Auburn and was occupied by Miss Mae
Fehr, of Landingville, Miss Henrietta Lee of Springfield, Massachusetts and Elmer Drumheller of Orwigsburg.  
Norman Mimm sustained a fractured arm; Miss Scheipe was cut about the face and a bracelet which she wore
about her wrist was bent so badly that it penetrated the flesh.  The Koch machine was coming towards
Schuylkill Haven and the Fritz machine towards Orwigsburg when the accident occurred.  Less than five
minutes after the accident no less than a score of other machines were lined up along the road.  Ralph Deibert
of Orwigsburg conveyed the injured to the former county seat, where they were attended to by Dr. Harry
Dechert.  The Koch auto turned turtle as a result of the collision.

ASSUMED CHARGE OF CLOTHING STORE
George A. Berger, the well known Dock Street grocery man, in the interest of the creditors, assumed the
temporary managership of the E. G. Underwood clothing and gents furnishing store on Thursday morning.  His
many friends have not been slow to visit him at his new quarters and to wish him well.


The Call of July 20, 1917

WANT LOCAL RAILROADERS TO GO TO FRANCE
The Reading Railroad Company is now making a canvass of all employees who are registered and are subject
to draft.  It takes in all those in the train service, shops and offices.  A local Reading Railroad engineer stated
that he was called into the office of the company and asked his age, the number of dependents upon him
under sixteen years of age and if married or not.  He was then asked the question whether he would be willing
to go to France and run a train there.  It is understood that railroads will put forth efforts to procure men for
railroad service abroad.  Several of the higher officials of the Reading road recently visited Schuylkill haven
and made mention of the fact that nearly fifty telegraph operators would be taken from the Reading road alone
and sent to France.

INJURED IN LEAP FROM SPEEDING AUTO
Miss Jennie Davis, of Pottsville, and Miss Anna Brennan, a cousin from Philadelphia, were brought to the
office of Dr. Heim on Friday night last, suffering with slight injuries which they claim were sustained in leaping
from a speeding auto.  The one woman sustained a slight bruise above the eye and the other a slight injury to
her knee.  It was stated that the two women were enroute to Schuylkill Haven to visit friends and were just
leaving their home when an auto came along and the driver volunteered to bring the women to Schuylkill
Haven, being enroute to Hamburg.  When he got to Liberty Street, the women claim he refused to stop and put
on full speed.  With the auto going at this rate, they leaped out unto the road with the above result, being
fortunate not to have been seriously injured.  It is said that they were brought to the office of Dr. Heim by a
party named Bautsch, who found them walking to town.  The identity of the driver of the car is unknown.

ATE HIS WAY INTO THE ARMY
Frequently one hears what is known as twentieth century wonders, but it remained for Mason E. Mease, of
town, to go one better, when he actually ate his way into the army.  Mease was several pounds underweight
when he applied for admittance to the ranks of Company C Engineers of Pottsville.  He was given several
hours in which to bring up his weight.  Procuring a number of bananas, he devoured them and then drank a
quantity of water.  At the appointed time he returned to the examining surgeon and was found to be nearly
four pounds over the required weight.  He was passed.  This shows the "stuff" of which the Schuylkill Haven
boys are composed of and will stand them good when they get into action abroad.

MERCHANT HOY SUSTAINS BURNED HAND
Merchant P. T. Hoy sustained painful burns of the right hand and had a most miraculous escape from serious
injury last evening when fumes from a gasoline hose became ignited in a mysterious manner.  The end of the
hose was placed in the auto in which was located a lantern.  Suddenly the end of the hose blew out, broke the
globe on the lantern and flaming, wound itself about the leg of Mr. Hoy.  F. B. Keller was nearby and pulling off
his coat, threw it around Mr. Hoy, extinguishing the flames.  No other damage was done.  The auto belonged to
a party residing in the Tumbling Run valley.  Two small children jumped from the auto and escaped being
burned.


The Call of July 27, 1917

YOUTH RENDERED UNCONSCIOUS
William Berger, aged ten years, son of John A. Berger of Coal Street, was rendered unconscious in a fall on
Wednesday evening.  The Berger boy was playing with a number of companions some years his senior when
he was picked up and thrown over their heads.  He landed with considerable force upon a rock.  Dr. Lessig
was summoned and restored him yo consciousness.  The child had a miraculous escape from sustaining a
fractured skull or concussion of the brain.

ARRESTED AS COMMON NUISANCE
A well known woman of this locality was placed under arrest this week by Constable Butz on the charge of
being a common nuisance.  She was taken before Squire Kline where she paid the costs and fine.  Complaint
was made against the woman by neighbors.

A REGULAR PALM BEACH
The Killian Dams have been christened the Palm Beach of Schuylkill Haven.  Nightly, scores of both male and
female can be seen bathing in the cool waters of the dams.  The ladies have been granted the privilege of
using a home nearby to robe and disrobe, which is a great convenience.  A large number of persons are taking
advantage of the opportunity and are learning to swim.
ADS FROM THE
CALL IN JULY OF
1917