YEARS GONE BY
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MARCH 1919
The Call of March 7, 1919

LANDMARK RAZED
The frame building opposite the Christ Lutheran Church was razed by Christ Richert on Thursday.  The building
is quite a landmark, it having been erected many years ago and used for many and varied purposes.  Of late
years it was used as a bumming shanty for young boys and came to be quite a nuisance.  Its removal will at
least enhance the appearance of the street at this point.

OWNER OF DEAD DUCK DISCOVERED
Several weeks ago excitement was caused in our business section when a duck termed a wild duck took
refuge on top of a high telegraph pole on Main Street.  The duck was soon brought down by a shot from the
rifle of William Quinter.  It has now been learned that the duck was the property of Mrs. Dan Roeder of Canal
Street, who is a relative of Mr. Quinter and that the same was not a wild one but one whom Mrs. Roeder was
trying to fatten up to make a meal for her family.  No arrests will follow as all parties concerned appreciate the
joke

NEW SAFETY BOXES PLACED
Last week eighty new safety deposit boxes were placed in the vaults of the Schuylkill Haven Trust Company.  
This number is but one half of the order placed with the manufacturers over a year ago.  The delay in
furnishing the same was due to the fact that the plant had been taken over by the War Department.  

POLICEMAN IN FOR IT AGAIN
The poor, skinny, dumb and silent policeman near the junction of Center Avenue and Dock Street came in for
another berating by councilmen at this meeting.  At the last monthly meeting this "guy" it was stated, was not
in the proper position to allow teams and autos to make the turn going north or south.  All sorts of claims were
made that he was a hindrance and dangerous to the traveling public.  Accordingly, therefore, a motion was
made at the council meeting of last month that he be moved toward the Dock Street line.  At the meeting on
Monday another argument was brought up to the effect that his position, which still remains the same, is the
best and most proper and that of the Road Committee were to move him per their instructions, he would
interfere with traffic.  Discussion pro and con was had on the subject and then it was dropped without any
definite information being given one way or another.  Maybe the poor fellow will resign until the next meeting
and avoid further discussion.


The Call of March 14, 1919

SCHOOL NOTES
Quite a number of pupils were absent from school during the week on account of suffering from colds.  There
have been no truancy cases reported lately.  The pupils of the high school seem to be quite interested in the
study of French and all are getting along very nicely with the subject.  The next holiday that will be observed
by the schools will be Memorial Day.  The participants in the coming play are busily engaged in rehearsing for
the production of the same.  It will be rendered on Friday, March 28th, in the high school auditorium.  The
name of the play is the "Gypsy Rovers."

SLIGHT WRECK ON PENNSY
A slight wreck occurred on the Pennsylvania Railroad a short distance below town, at what is known as the
"water trough" near Bowen's farm, Monday afternoon about 1:30 o'clock.  Three loaded hoppers jumped the
track.  No one was injured but traffic was tied up until late in the evening and north and south bound trains
were run over the Reading.


The Call of March 21, 1919

MAY BUILD BOWLING ALLEY
There is some rumor of negotiations now being on between some out of town parties and the owners of the
lot on West Main Street between the two hotel properties for its purchase.  It is understood the idea is to
erect a building that can be used for a bowling alley, a shooting gallery and a pool room.  Nothing definite
could be learned.

ANOTHER PIONEER MERCHANT TO RETIRE
William Greenawald, one of this town's most prominent merchants will retire from active business on April 1st.  
Mr. Greenawald is also one of the town's pioneer merchants, having opened a flour and feed store in the
building a few doors above his present location forty years ago.  After the first eight years of business, Mr.
Greenawald purchased the corner property which he now occupies.  While Mr. Greenawald was always known
to be a conservative businessman and very reserved in seeking publicity, he was also known to be most
honorable and upright in all his dealings.  Mr. Greenawald has disposed of his business to one William K.
Loos, formerly of Reading, who since November 1918, has been in th employ of Mr. Greenawald.  Mr. Loos will
conduct the business along the same lines as heretofore, carrying a complete stock of flour, feeds and
seeds.  Thursday he purchased a one ton Ford truck from local agent John Ebling.

ROAD BUILDING BAD FOR THE KIDS
Residents of Columbia Street complain about the filling up of the middle of this street with trap rock by the
borough.  It is claimed the youngsters use the stones for stone fights with one another and that stones
sometimes fly thick and fast.  It is suggested that hereafter Street Commissioner Huy, when building roads on
this street either tie or glue the stones fast or else pave the street in order to guard against the above
practice.

BURNING DUMP
The burning dump above Connor's Crossing has received a new name and by a stranger at that.  The "burning
coal mine" is what the man termed it and while on the subject the same man suggested the use of the now idle
gas masks which the government has on its hands.  While the suggestion appears in the light of a joke, one
has but to go by there on a rainy or foggy day and convince himself of the seriousness of the "joke."

NEEDLES IN BREAD
A Spring Garden woman tells us about her having found two large needles in a loaf of baker's bread recently.  
The woman was preparing sandwiches for luncheon when the knife struck something solid and investigation
showed a needle of several inches in length embedded in the loaf.  A day later while her husband, while riding
on a train, was eating a sandwich, he stopped short when he struck something solid.  Removing the hunk from
his mouth he discovered it contained a needle.  Had it not been for the plate of his false teeth, which
prevented the needle from penetrating the roof of his mouth, he might have been painfully wounded.  
Needless to say this woman now breaks her own bread.


The Call of March 28, 1919

PLACED HIS HOUSEKEEPER IN JAIL
George Dearwachter, residing near the South Ward school building in the pottery row, had his housekeeper,
Annie Cassel, placed under arrest for breaking into his home and stealing from the house after he had fired
her.  The hearing was held before Squire Moyer and Annie, despite her protests, was taken to Hotel Walton in
Pottsville to await a hearing before the court.

EMPTY HOUSES SCARCE AND IN DEMAND
The demand for houses to rent in Schuylkill Haven at this particular time is quite heavy.  The Call has had many
inquiries as to whether there are any houses for rent and inquiry and about town has failed to reveal more
than about two or three of them.  Despite the fact that there are a number of persons who move from place to
place it seems that as soon as one house is empty there are no less than a dozen applicants for it and no
house containing the average conveniences and being in fairly good condition will remain empty very long
just at this time of the year.

LOCAL FIRM BEGINS MANUFACTURE OF SOFT DRINKS
This week the Schuylkill Haven Soft Drink Company began the manufacture of its soft drink beverages.  
Concentrated soft drinks will be made.  A number if large orders are on hand and will keep the plant working
for some time.  The firm is composed of Samuel Buehler, and C. Updegrave.  Their three special soft drinks will
be Cherry and Orange Blossomade, Olemo Lemon Juice and It's Wild Cherry.

BOYS HAD TO PAY FOR THEIR SHOOTING
Two boys, one from town and one from Cressona, who it is alleged shot at the Spanhuth washery along the
Schuylkill River at the base of the Schuylkill Mountain had to pay for their Wild West antics.  They were placed
under arrest by Officer Butz, brought before Squire Moyer, required to pay the costs and a nominal fine for
shooting in the borough.
ADS FROM
THE CALL
NEWSPAPER IN
MARCH 1919