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he Call of September 3, 1920

ASSIGNMENT OF SCHOOL PUPILS
Tuesday morning, September 7th, the public schools will open for a nine month term.  Everything has been put in readiness to
receive the nine hundred or more scholars.  The rooms have had a thorough cleaning and fumigation.  The ward buildings in need
of repair have had attention.   New books and supplies in most of the rooms has been issued.  Some changes in branches have also
been made in a number of the schools.  A new eighth grade will be opened in the Haven Street building.  The teaching corps has
undergone a half dozen or more changes.  That is, new teachers have been elected to fill vacancies and additions made to the
force.

LARGE TREES REMOVED
The large willow trees in front of the property of Charles Wagner on West Main Street and those in front of the property of George
Turner on Columbia Street, which were some of the oldest trees in town and also of the largest, were chopped down recently.  The
task of chopping them down was no small one.

A PECULIAR TREE
In the yard of Mrs. Albert Brommer of Haven Street, is a bush that has attracted considerable attention by reason of its peculiar and
rare plumage.  It is about eight feet in height and covered with clusters of round berries about the size of large huckleberries.  The
berries are in large bunches and upon appearance are green in color.  They next turn yellow and then an orange shade and before
withering will turn red.  It is a species of European ash and is the only tree of this kind in town.

DOG BIT BOY ABOVE EYE
Jerald, son of Daniel Wolfe, of Penn Street, was bitten above the eye by "Mike" the dog belonging to Charles Tallman.  The wound
bled considerably and the services of a physician were required.  The wound was cauterized by Dr. Lessig.  The dog had gotten
loose from its kennel and was walking along Saint John Street with the chain dragging on the pavement.  The boy happened along
and stooped to pick up the chain when "Mike," mistaking his intentions, sunk his teeth into the youngster's forehead.

ARRESTED FOR THROWING STONES
Mrs. Harry Haas had Mrs. Bess Kantner arrested for trespassing and assault.  The hearing before Squire Moyer resulted in the case
being settled by Mrs. Kantner paying the costs.  Both are residents of lower Canal Street near the locks.


The Call of September 10, 1920

BOARD OF HEALTH MEETING
After a number of vain attempts, the Board of Health was enabled to gather together a majority of its members and a meeting was
held Friday evening.  Only a few minor matters along the line of nuisances were reported and ordered attended to by the health
officer.  A lengthy list of homes placarded and later on fumigated together with a list of contagious diseases were given.  During the
month of July there were sixteen contagious diseases, they all being measles.  During the month of August there were seven cases
of measles and one of diphtheria.

ARRESTED FOR STEALING WATERMELONS
Elmer Swymer of Reading, LeMar Boyer and Samuel Heffner of Cressona and B. Kantner of town, were arrested by Officer Duffy for
stealing watermelons from a car standing near the "J" office.  The one door of the car had been broken on its arrival in town and
the boys, noticing the melons through the open doorway could not resist the temptation to sample a few.  As a result they were
required to pay for the melons and small costs in the case.

PREPARING FOR 75TH ANNIVERSARY
It is understood definite arrangements and preparations are being made by Carroll Lodge, I. O. O. F. of town to observe the seventy
fifth anniversary of the institution of the local order of Odd Fellows.  It is proposed to make the event a three day celebration and if
it is possible the same is to take place some time this fall.  Mr. Roy Brownmiller has been selected as Degree Master and the lodge
is organizing a degree team to be composed of some sixty members.  Efforts are being made to have a perfect degree team and
with this accomplished will have many calls from other lodges in this section of the state.

TROLLEYS MUST STOP
At this week's borough council meeting, Councilman McKeone inquired whether there was a borough ordinance requiring the
trolley cars coming down Main Street to first stop at Main and Saint John Streets before running through to Saint John Street.  That
by reason of the practice of not stopping very often accidents with teams and autos were narrowly averted.  Burgess Sharadin
reported they were required to stop at the point mentioned and that he would take up the matter with the company again and see
that the cars stopped on each trip.

EMBARKED IN GENERAL HAULING BUSINESS
Carl Shoener, of Saint John Street, an ex serviceman, who recently received his discharge from the service, has embarked in the
drayage and general hauling business.  He recently purchased the horses, wagon and equipment of Herman Witman who has
discontinued this particular business.


The Call of September 17, 1920

TRUANT OFFICER BUSY
Officer Butz was called into service this week by the school authorities to investigate the absence of a half dozen or more
scholars.  One was brought to school and the other cases were satisfactorily adjusted.  The State Department of Education has
issued a warning to all school districts that the compulsory school law of the state must be enforced more stringently than ever
before.  Excuses that heretofore were sufficient to warrant pupils being kept out of school for a day or two will not be
countenanced by the school board in any instance.  Such flimsy excuses as helping mother with the washing or baking or having a
headache, or the parents taking the children on a day's vacation out of town will not be sufficient to warrant absence from school.

SHOE FACTORY ADDITION IS UNDERWAY
The new addition to the W. Y. Miller shoe factory is well underway, the brick work at this writing having been completed to the
second floor.  It is planned to have the new addition under roof within a week after which the work of placing the machinery and
converting the present and new structure into one plant will be begun.

HEAVY WEIGHT TOMATO
Mrs. William Ney, of Columbia Street, has a tomato which surely would have won a prize at any of the county fairs.  It weighs two
pounds and one ounce.  We would be glad to hear of others having extra large sized or extra heavy weight fruit or vegetables.

TO ORGANIZE BROTHERHOOD
In an effort to organize a Lutheran Brotherhood, a special service will be held in the Saint Matthew's Lutheran Church on Thursday
evening, September 23rd.  There will be a special program and an out of town speaker.  All the men of the congregation and Sunday
School are urged to be in attendance.


The Call of September 24, 1920

TWO SLIGHT FIRES
Two slight fires occurred in the Spring Garden section of town this week.  Monday morning the curtains in one of the upper rooms
of the Thomas Peale home were set on fire by one of the youngsters playing with matches.  The flames were extinguished by Mrs.
Peale with a few buckets of water.
Early Thursday morning the Breininger ice house along the level was noticed in flames.  On account of the wet condition of the
timbers, the fire quickly burned itself out or it was extinguished by watchmen from the Philadelphia and reading car shops.

SMOKE NUISANCE ELIMINATED
For some time past, residents of Saint John Street have been annoyed by smoke in clouds from engines whose fires were shaken
while lying along or shifting on the tracks below this street.  A careful record was kept by one of the Saint John Street merchants of
the offenses of this nature committed.  The data was turned over to one of the officials of the company who in a very courteous
letter thanked the merchant for calling his attention to the matter and assured him the nuisance would be promptly abated.  Reports
are to the effect that the smoke nuisance has already been considerably abated.

ALL WEST WARD WOMEN REGISTERED
The West ward of Schuylkill Haven has made the best showing of any of the four wards so far as the women are concerned.  Each
and every one of the eighty one women eligible to vote in this ward presented themselves to the assessor and furnished all
information necessary.  The assessor in this ward made it known where he would be for this purpose and each and every one of
them was on hand at the required time and place.  
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THE CALL
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SEPTEMBER 1920