YEARS GONE BY
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The Call of October 3, 1919

TEETH WERE LOCKED FOR THREE DAYS
The cutting of wisdom teeth by Mrs. Joseph Marsh of Margaretta Street caused her considerable pain and dangerous
complications.  For three days the latter part of last week, the jaws of Mrs. Marsh were locked as it were and lockjaw was feared.  
She could take but liquid food during this period and this had to be forced between the crevices of her teeth.

WOMAN HELD UP SATURDAY EVENING
Mrs. Harry Boyer of Fairmount, while returning from the Bitzer butcher shop, Saturday evening, when on the Columbia Street
bridge, was accosted by a stranger who grabbed her by the throat and demanded her money.  Autos appearing on the scene scared
the fellow away and prevented a probable robbery.

SCHOOL GARDENS RETURN $63.75
A survey made from slips signed by the parents of twenty school gardeners showed the following results.  The cost of seeds per
plot ranged from nothing to fifty cents and the result in dollars and cents per plot, from .80 cents to $6.75.  The entire cost for seeds
for twenty plots was $5.55 and the returns from these plots totaled $63.75.  The plots were planted and cultivated under the
supervision of Miss Tillie Meyer, with all work done by the children from grades four to seven inclusive.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASE IN TOWN
During the month of September, there were eight contagious diseases in Schuylkill Haven reported to the Board of Health.  Of this
number six were scarlatina and one diphtheria and one measles case.  Three of the scarlatina and the case of diphtheria developed
during the past week.  During the month seven homes were fumigated and the patients permitted to go outdoors.  The Board of
Health failed to hold its monthly meeting on Monday evening on account of there not being a quorum present.

COMPENSATION NOT ALLOWED
The compensation claim of Dory Seibert of Garfield Avenue, heard by Referee Seidel on Monday was disallowed.  Mr. Seibert
claimed compensation for disability caused by an accident in which he came in contact with an electric socket at the WalkIn shoe
factory.  The referee in his decision claimed Mr. Seibert's condition is due to Bright's disease of a chronic nature and not to th
electric shock sustained.


The Call of October 10, 1919

PLACED NEW TRACK
The trolley company this week placed a new track at the corner of Main and Dock Streets.  With a gang of trackmen working at this
point, the building operations at the Moore hospital requiring the hauling away of ground, and the digging of a trench on both sides
of the trolley road bed for the placing of a water pipe certainly made this corner a busy one and dangerous.  Autoists and teamsters
were required to exercise great care in passing this point.

RECORD LOCALITY FOR CHILDREN
Liberty and William Streets probably hold the record for the largest number of children below nine years of age.  From a careful
survey of the families residing on these two streets, we are informed that there are one hundred and twenty nine youngsters from
babyhood to the nine year limit.  The school board might well look to the erection of a school building in this section shortly.

OPENED ELECTRICAL SHOP
High Coxe, one of our soldier boys, recently embarked in the electrical contracting and repair business and thus far has completed
a number of jobs.  Saturday of last week he established himself in headquarters at 214 East Main Street, the shop formerly occupied
by Bill Saylor, the well known plumber.  Mr. Coxe intends to put in stock all kinds of electrical supplies, such as lamps, fixtures and
the numerous electrical labor saving devices and conveniences.


The Call of October 17, 1919

NO HALLOWEEN PARADE HERE
It is hardly likely this town will have an All-Halloween parade this year.  We have yet to learn of any movement underway to hold the
same.  The yearly event will of course be celebrated with the usual number of young folks parading about in fantastic garb and
property owners can prepare to take their gates and signboards to bed with them or else find them misplaced.  Quite a number of
Halloween indoor parties are being arranged for and there will be several Halloween dances in Keystone Hall.

EQUIPPED TO CATER TO ALL
The formal opening of the Charles Michel confectionery store and ice cream parlor took place Saturday evening.  Even though the
weather was rather unfavorable the large storeroom was crowded for several hours during the evening.  All who attended were
loud in their expressions a what a pretty appearance the storeroom makes and the ample provision made to cater to the desires of
the public in the way of confectionery, ice cream and sodas.  The Bensinger Orchestra rendered selections during the evening.  All
present were given souvenirs.

AGAIN SENT TO JAIL
Some months ago Patrick Ryan was brought before Squire Moyer, charged with indecent conduct towards a child by Daniel Morgan
of the West Ward.  Morgan had beaten up Ryan pretty badly and it was thought best to send him to the hospital.  He had recovered
sufficiently this week to answer the charge before the squire.  After hearing some of the facts, it was thought best to remand him to
jail to have the court decide on the merits of the case.


The Call of October 24, 1919

STOLE PIG FROM HOTEL MAN
The forepart of the week, D. Kauffman purchased a live pig which he intended having butchered and served in his cafe.  However,
some unknown persons learned of the fact and decided to appropriate the pig for their own use.  Accordingly, therefore, Tuesday
evening his pigship was made away with and up to this time his honor has not been located
.

CHURCH IMPROVEMENTS NOW UNDERWAY
Work on the improvements to the auditorium at the Lutheran church were commenced on Tuesday when the big scaffolding was put
together.  The same will be used for the frescoing of the ceiling.  This will require several weeks time.  As soon as this work is
completed the new organ will be completed.  One of the features of the new pipe organ will be that one of the stops will give an
almost exact reproduction of the human voice.  On account of the improvements underway, the church services will be held in the
Sunday School room during this period.


The Call of October 31, 1919

DID NOT SLEEP FOR AN ENTIRE WEEK
Because of severe pain caused by a very sore thumb knuckle, Walter Fisher of Main Street, has been unable to sleep for an entire
week.  He has had the same lanced several times and at this writing it is coming along nicely.  The member was bruised in some way
or other and became infected.

HOW ABOUT THE OPERA HOUSE?
In a discussion about the basketball outlook for Schuylkill Haven this season, the statement was again made that the only thing
preventing this town from being represented is the fact that no suitable hall where the public can be accommodated can be
procured.  The opera house on Saint Peter Street was mentioned as a place that could be easily converted onto a suitable
basketball hall.  It was suggested that with the removal of the gallery and the placing of a cage lengthwise, seats could be erected
along the sides and on the stage and one other end of the cage sufficient to seat several hundred persons.  It was thought if the
heating apparatus could be put into shape, this would make an ideal hall for this winter sport.  The third floor for dancing following
the game was also mentioned as being a means of obtaining additional revenue.

TO OPEN FISH HOUSE
Rumor has it that in the very near future, the hotel property formerly occupied by Warren Brown will be taken over by Earl Witman,
of Pottsville, who for years resided in this town.  "Earl" as he is familiarly known, it is said will conduct a fish and oyster stand
.

MANY ATTEND HUSKING BEE
Many persons attended the corn husking be at the H. W. Bressler farm outside of Schuylkill Haven on Tuesday afternoon.  The
event proved an enjoyable and successful affair.  Three corn patches were cleaned up, there being between 400 and 450 bushels
of corn husked.  A large amount of it was also hauled into the barn.  Mr. Bressler wishes to thank all persons who assisted in the
husking of the corn.  Seventy four persons partook of the supper served in the evening, the table which accommodated fifteen
persons being filled five times.  All had a splendid time.
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