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100 CALLED FOR EXAMINATION
One hundred men of Class One of the drafted men have been called for examination at the Town Hall, Monday and Tuesday,
February 11 and 12.  Sixty of the number are to report Monday and forty on Tuesday.  There are twenty two men from Schuylkill
Haven included in the list.  This district still has twelve men to be sent away before the quota for the district to the first draft army is
complete.  It is likely notice will be received the fore part of the coming week to order twelve men to report and leave for Fort
Meade, Saturday, February 23.  Among these twelve men it is expected there will be at least four from Schuylkill Haven.  Persons
who will be kind enough to assist the board in the clerical work connected with the present reclassification, as per the direct
request of the United States government, are asked to present themselves at the Town Hall on Friday afternoon or evening or all
day Saturday of this week and Monday evening of next week.

THEY FOUGHT WITH SHOVELS
Coal, precious coal, was the cause of a fight at the local shops on Wednesday afternoon.  A car of rice coal was being unloaded and
when some of the coal was sent flying to the floor of the boiler shops, William Frey, the fireman, became angered.  One word led to
another and soon Frey and Charles Shadler, of town, were fighting with shovels.  Shadler brought suit against Frey before Squire C.
A. Moyer.  Constable Butz served the warrant.  Frey, who is a native of Cressona, waived a hearing and entered bail for his
appearance at court.

EARLY ROBIN SEES FEW WORMS
From all sections of the town, people report the presence of a robin red breast.  It was observed in Spring Garden, on Saint John
Street and on Berne Street.  It was also observed by Frank Lenker in the yard of his father on Main Street.  Although it is somewhat
early for this species of bird, it evidently has hustled forward to engage hotel accommodations for others who are wintering in the
sunny southern climes.

CLEAN UP DAYS HELPED SOME
The snow Clean Up Days held Sunday and Monday last, while not the complete success they should have been, were helpful in
making traffic conditions on some streets more passable and less dangerous.  Very few citizens responded to the call of the
burgess to shovel snow.  Quite a number of the teamsters, however, lent their teams and auto trucks on both days.  The E. P. R.
Company had its dirt car at the service of the burgess on Sunday.  Quite a quantity of snow was removed and dumped at the end of
East Liberty Street.

AT WORK ON AMBULANCES
The employees of the Losch Machine Shop are at work on the construction of five ambulances for the Madera Hill Coal Company.  
Four Cadillac and one Pierce Arrow are being lengthened for this purpose at the shops.  When this work is completed they will be
taken to the Cressona Wagon Works where the body will be placed.  It is believed that these ambulances may see service in foreign
countries.

NOTES OF OUR PUBLIC SCHOOL
Last evening several of the teachers began their work of assisting the local draft board in the clerical work connected with the new
classification of registrants at the Town Hall.  Lincoln's and Washington's birthday anniversaries will be fittingly observed by every
school in the district.  On both occasions programs of a patriotic nature will be rendered and already the scholars are rehearsing
their respective parts.  To those exercises the public is cordially invited.  
Accordion to the statements of the school authorities, Tuesday of the present week was probably the coldest day of the winter
months thus far experienced.  In the high school building where considerable trouble has been experienced with the heating, each
room was satisfactorily heated.  This was done by only five furnaces. "Heatless Mondays" are being taken advantage of by a number
of ex high school pupils who are employed in this and other towns.  Although they bid goodbye to their alma mater years ago, the
pleasant thought of their school hood days still linger with them and they visit the schools.
The gym is being put to practical use at the present time as the result of a number of improvements.  For the present the officials
do not sanction the placing of regular gym apparatus in position but are content to allow the playing of basketball.  During the
present week, several interesting contests were played and both thoroughly enjoyed.  On Monday evening following the closing
session of the school, one of the high school teams played the Moki team.

DISASTROUS RESULT OF HEATLESS MONDAY
A disastrous result of the "Heatless Monday" this week was experienced Tuesday at the Walkin Shoe Company.  During Monday a
portion of the sprinkler system on the third floor froze and when heat was put into the building Tuesday, burst.  This resulted in
many gallons of water pouring down from the ceiling on the third floor upon dozens and dozens of shoes in the course of making,
ruining many completely and damaging others beyond repair.  The water coming through the floor drenched the office and its
contents.  The water was finally shut off and the damage repaired.  By way of explanation it might be stated that the sprinkler system
is a network of pipes running along the ceiling on all floors in all departments.  It is a protection against fire.  In the event of a fire
small plugs in the pipes are melted and allow the water to drain upon the flames.


The Call of February 15, 1918

CELLARS FLOODED ON BERNE STREET
Residents along the hill on Berne Street felt the effects of the thaw of the present week.  Comparatively few homes and cellars
escaped having water in them and hand pumps were put to good use.  In the cellars of Harry Coldren and James Fisher the water
was several feet deep and prevented the family from getting near their furnaces and coal bins.  These were the only two places
where damage was done.

ACCEPTS I. B. HEIM'S CHALLENGE
William Bautsch of 74 Berne Street accepts the challenge of merchant I. B. Heim on egg production.  Mr. Bautsch states that from
seven hens he obtained eighty one eggs during the month of January.  This he accomplished by talking to the hens in a nice
manner, proper food and keeping their thoughts directed from the question of war and the high cost of living.

EXPLODING STOVE CAUSES FIRE
The exploding of an oil stove in the rooms of the Moki Club on Sunday evening, ignited the carpet and floor.  Fortunately the flames
were immediately discovered and the flames extinguished.  The club room is located in the Filbert building.  Fire Chief Commings
was immediately notified of the fire and assisted in extinguishing the same.

NO MORE DINNERS AT SALES
Free dinners at public sales is practically a thing of the past.  During the past several weeks, The Call has printed hundreds of sale
bills and on each was inscribed, "No Dinner or Meals Served."  The old idea that free meals attracted buyers has been given up as a
fallacy, they only attract those who take advantage of the generosity.  No doubt the war and the present high cost of living are
directly responsible for the cutting out of the free meals.

STARTED IMPROVEMENTS ON PROPERTY
Monday of the present week, J. M. Gipe, started a force of men at work on improvements to his recently purchased property on
Main Street.  The awning has been removed and carpenters are now at work on the interior.  Mr. Gipe stated he does not expect
these improvements to be completed before July or August.  In case any person desires his present location he will speed up the
improvements.

THEFTS OF COAL REPORTED
A number of thefts of coal from loaded cars was reported this week in town.  In several instances the persons stealing the coal
were observed by pedestrians but no attempt was made to molest them.  It is understood that it is up to the individual to prosecute
in case they are offended.


The Call of February 22, 1918

THIS MULE SIMPLY FLEW
There is at least one mule that simply flew in Schuylkill Haven and that mule belongs to Francis Boltzer.  Monday noon, Boltzer with
a load of wood was going down Main Street.  The 12:00 trolley car in charge of Conductor Tucker came along.  Without warning of
any kind, the car struck Boltzer's wagon.  So hard was the impact that the mule made one leap into the air and never landed on terra
firma until it reached the Reading tracks.  Wood flew in all directions but fortunately Boltzer was not thrown from the wagon.  The
accident was witnessed by a half a dozen people, who claim that the trolley company is violating the borough ordinance in not
having their cars under control and stopping at the corner of Main and Saint John Streets.

SHOP MAY WORK LONGER HOURS SOON
There is every possibility that the employees of the local shops will go on longer hours the first of the ensuing month.  While no
definite information was obtainable, it is known that several of the officials were summoned to Reading this week and that they are
now engaged in preparing data.  The government is back of the movement, as it is their intention to keep all rolling equipment in
continuous service.  It is also further reported that with the longer hours, will come an increase in pay.

LOCAL RAILROADERS COMPLAIN OF "SNAPPERS"
A large number of Reading railroaders are complaining about "Reading Snappers" coming to this section and doing the work that
rightfully belongs to them.  One railroader stated this week that he was home nearly four days and in that time witnessed a certain
Reading crew in this locality no less than three times.  He further states there is sufficient work at Saint Clair and Cressona to keep
the men busy all the time and that the presence of the Reading men here is not necessary.

MOVE POOL ROOM TO HOTEL GRAND
The firm of Kessler and Heckman, who conducted a pool room on the upper floor of the Hess barber shop on Saint John Street, has
been dissolved, the interest being purchased by Kessler.  On the first of the ensuing month, Kessler will move the room to the
basement of Hotel Grand.  Adam Moyer, who owns the building, stated that he has several applicants for the place.
ADS FROM THE CALL
NEWSPAPER IN
FEBRUARY OF 1918