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The Call of August 2, 1918

CLOSES HIS BARBER SHOP
Harry Eiler, who for the past several years had conducted a barber shop under the Spring Garden Hotel, closed his place of business
during the week.  Mr. Eiler has accepted a position at the County Home and assumed his new duties the first day of the present month.

HEALTH BOARD WILL TRY TO STOP BAD ODOR
A number of very important items occupied the attention of the members of the Board of Health at their regular meeting on Monday night.  
Probably the foremost one was the nuisance arising from the filling in of the new yard above Connor's Crossing.  It was decided to take
the matter up with the State Health Department and endeavor to have this nuisance abated.  Two residents of Union Street were reported
as maintaining nuisances in the way of unkept chicken coops.  Health Officer Butz reported that he had made an investigation and found
everything satisfactory and that the report was made as a matter of spite work rather than for the benefit of the community.  The board was
also in receipt of a number of communications from the government, relative to the treatment of social disease, that the government is
making every effort to stamp out all over the country.  Circulars were enclosed that are to be given to persons afflicted.  The rules for
persons afflicted are very stringent and abuse of the same is punishable by law.

230 EMPLOYEES AT CAR SHOPS
The names of 230 employees are now enrolled at the Schuylkill Haven car shops and still further efforts are being made to obtain other
employees.  Men with experience in the building and repairing of cars are desired.  During the present week, the following men started
work at the shops: Clark Frehafer, John Schaeffer, Edward B. Long, William L. Zweizig, William A. Huling and George Hinkle.

DRIVER HAS NARROW ESCAPE
A young farmer by the name of Long, residing at Sculp's Hill, near Landingville, had a narrow escape from serious injury Tuesday noon.  He
was driving a spirited team of young horses on Dock Street when nearing The Call office corner, the pole of the wagon came out.  The
horses tore loose from the wagon.  With one hand, Long held fast to the wagon and with the other to the reins.  Fortunately at the time Roy
Eiler and John Sell came along and both jumped for the bridle of either horse.  This alone prevented a serious runaway and injury to the
driver.

JOY RIDE ENDS IN SCRAP
A joy ride participated in by a young married woman and a party of children, ended in a scrap on Wednesday evening in the West Ward.  It
appears that the young married woman took the horse and wagon of a farmer, loaded the same with a gang of children and then drove to
Cressona and back.  It was when they got back that the scrap started.  Hair pulling, slapping of faces and a few kicks all figured in the
excitement and amusement of the residents of the ward.  It lasted until such time as Constable Butz made his appearance and drove all
back to their trenches.

BUTCHER DETWEILER WILL HAVE TWO TEAMS ON THE ROAD
In order to accommodate the increasing number of patrons and to enable him to serve them more promptly and earlier in the day, butcher
Mark Detweiler, beginning on Saturday, will operate two teams instead of one as heretofore.  Mr. Detweiler will serve from one team and
Oscar Fritz from the second team.  For the present all local routes will be served daily.


The Call of August 9, 1918

FOLLOWED "THE CALL'S" SUGGESTION
The Call's suggestion of several weeks ago was followed on this week by the borough council when it placed a dummy policeman at the
corner of Dock Street and Center Avenue on Wednesday.  Thursday Constable Butz began taking the numbers of machines that did not
keep to the right and the owners will be called upon to pay a fine.  Up to Thursday noon, Constable Butz had the numbers of nearly fifty
autos and auto trucks.  Ignorance of the meaning of the policeman will be no excuse for not paying a fine.  Where a fine is imposed for a
traffic violation, it must be paid and the victim of the suit can then appeal to the courts afterwards.

ICE PLANT MACHINERY BREAKS
Some of the machinery at the Baker Coal & Ice plant broke on Wednesday while the plant was being driven to its capacity.  Until this break
is repaired, the people are asked to practice economy in the use of ice.  The extreme weather of the past week caused a double demand
to be made on the plant for ice.  The necessary parts have been ordered and are expected within the course of a week.

COUNCIL NEWS
Mr. Saul stated that one end of the light plant was in need of repairs, namely the section where the new boilers were installed.  This
portion is in a somewhat dangerous condition and it should be built in before the winter sets in as the discrepancy between the old
building and the new addition was only temporarily built up.  Messrs. Lengle and Peale made a motion to advertise fr bids for the
enclosing of the new boilers at the plant.  An idea of what is contained can be obtained from the light committee.
The light committee reported having followed the suggestion of the fuel administrator in ordering twenty cars of coal to insure a supply
when coal becomes scarce during the winter.  It will be necessary to store the coal outside the plant.  It was thought this was far better
than not being able to procure coal later on.
Mr. Moyer reported having had three of the fire plugs reported in need of repairs properly repaired and that the others would receive
attention as soon as the proper materials and parts could be secured by the plumber.

1125 SCHOOL CHILDREN
Professor Ralph Ziegenfus has just completed the enumeration of the school children of town and finds that there are 1125 of the
required school age.  This is somewhat higher than the number of last year.  In one family there were seven of school age, while in
another family, it was ascertained that three children, the eldest 14 years of age, were still in the first grade.  The mother of the children
accounted for this by stating that there was considerable sickness in the family and that they had moved from one place to another.

SUGAR CANE BEING GROWN ON FARM HERE
Howard W. Weston, an insurance agent from Pottsville, has demonstrated that both sugar cane and sugar beet can be grown in this
locality.  On his war farm, located near the Baker farm, near Liberty Street, Mr. Weston has successfully grown both.  The cane has reached
a height of nearly five feet and is now bearing pods several inches in length.  Many farmers and others have viewed the cane and at first
thought it was a new species of corn.  When Mr. Weston undertook the raising of cane, he met with no encouragement from the State
Agricultural officials, who were not acquainted with the possibilities.  As a result of Weston's experiment, the raising of sugar cane in this
section may become quite an industry.


The Call of August 16, 1918

WARM WEATHER BRINGS PAY DAYS
The warm weather evidently brought two pay days to Schuylkill Haven this week.  On Monday the employees of the Pennsylvania Railroad
received their envelopes.  On Tuesday and Wednesday the Reading railroaders and shop hands were paid their wages for the last half of
July.  Some of the railroaders received as high as $125 and $150 and others still more.

NEW WASHERY WILL SOON BE IN FULL OPERATION
The new washery of Bittle and Spanhuth, located along the Schuylkill River at the foot of the Schuylkill Mountain will soon be in full
operation.  Already quite a number of tons of nice coal have been taken from the river bed.  This is the only washery in the immediate
section and it is believed particularly good coal can be procured.

MAY PROVIDE ANOTHER SWIMMING POOL
Another swimming pool may be provided for the residents of town and that with all conveniences.  The place decided upon is the Bittle
Dam, located in the South Ward.  It is first intended to draw the dam off, cleanse the same and then construct a concrete wall around the
three sides of the dam.  Bath houses for both men and women will be provided.  Residents of Berne Street have volunteered to help with
the work gratis.  William Spotts, the well known railroader, is at the head of the movement and actual work may be started any day.  The
dam is fed with numerous springs, thus making it one of the finest places in this section.  It would also provide adequate room for boating.

$68.09 COLLECTED IN FLAG
The sum of $68.09 was collected by the Red Cross Chapter in the parade tendered the drafted men on Friday evening last.  The amount
was a great surprise to all the members of the chapter and the appreciation of the members is extended to the donors.  The chapter is
badly in need of funds to continue their work and the above amount will tend to materially help them.

INSANE PATIENT COMES TO LIFE
Escaping from the County Insane Asylum, Andrew Smar, aged 38 years, started for Mahanoy City.  Being an epileptic, he fell along the road
side in an unconscious condition.  A passing auto picked up the man and took him to a morgue in Mahanoy City.  The body was placed in
an ice box and surrounded with ice.  After lying as a corpse for half hour, Smar leaped from the box and ran into the street.  He was
captured and again returned to the asylum.


The Call of August 23, 1918

COMMITTED FOR TEN DAYS
Squire William Kline, on Wednesday committed to the county prison for a period of ten days, John Vencavage.  
The defendant was arrested by Constable Butz on a charge of being a common nuisance.  Vencavage is an inmate at the County Home and
while under the influence of drink, laid on front porches and annoyed the occupants of Spring Garden.

BATHING SUITS AT PALM BEACH
William Killian, owner of "Palm Beach," has placed an order with a New York firm for the supplying of a hundred or more bathing suits.  
These suits have been ordered for next season.  Mr. Killian intends to make a great many improvements this fall, including the erection of
shower baths and bath houses.  The dam is to be cleansed and enlarged.


The Call of August 30, 1918

FRENCH SHELL ON EXHIBITION
Druggist Stine has on display in one of his show windows two French shells that have sent their contents into the ranks of the Huns and
have been made into attractive looking vases.  They are the property of Mrs. S. E. Mengle and were sent by her son, Edward Mengle,
sergeant in Company C of the 103rd Engineers.  They are what is styled 75 dm shells, are under twelve inches in height and three and a
quarter inches in diameter.

MUST STOP BURNING OF PAPER
Fire Marshal Commings informed The Call this week that the practice of persons burning waste paper and rubbish in alleys or lots near or
adjoining buildings will have to cease.  Hereafter any person caught doing so or violating the borough ordinance in this respect will be
prosecuted.  The ordinance prohibits having a fire of any kind within seventy five feet of any building and provides for punishment by fine.
ADS FROM THE
CALL NEWSPAPER
IN AUGUST OF 1918